The true purpose has been something of an unknown ever since it was discovered near Edinburgh, Scotland, but that hasn’t stopped people from visiting it in droves ever since it opened to visitors in 2003. Who doesn’t love a good mystery?

Finally, research has determined that the 2000 year old network of tunnels was actually originally a Druid temple. Throughout its long life, it’s also been connected to smugglers, the Knights Templar, and witchcraft.

Today, it’s a fun educational attraction that invites visitors to imagine the distant past. Meanwhile, it’s being restored to conserve what’s becoming an increasingly important historical site that still holds many baffling mysteries.

Even though historical record credits local blacksmith George Paterson with the construction of the long series of tunnels in 1724, it’s now been theorized that the temple was deliberately buried by the ancient Druids to protect its sanctity, which was a widespread practice during Pagan times.

“The work is beautifully consistent throughout and indicates a team of highly-skilled craftsmen, with numerous assistants, guided by a mastermind.” – Julian Spalding, former head of Glasgow’s museums and galleries

Julian Spalding hopes the site will someday recieve world heritage status, and then be declared an official stop on the Druid path, which links Rosslyn, Cairnpapple cairn, Dingwall, which was the ancient Viking capital of Scotland, and many other sites of great importance to Iron Age historians (and armchair historians like us).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2vdwRKI4D0